Diagnosing autism - services need to be increased, not reduced.

If you are a regular reader of my blog you probably know that my two boys both have a diagnosis of high functioning autism, sometimes called Asperger Syndrome. 

My boys are very different, both have different needs but thanks to some great support they are on their way to fulfilling their dreams.

It was not always like this.  Our journey to diagnosis for the boys was long, convoluted and costly.  In many ways it was so much easier with Daisy, her disability was so extreme and obvious the support clicked into place immediately.

It’s different with the so called “invisible disabilities” however.  The lifelong neurodevelopmental disorders that fall within the autism spectrum are difficult to spot and children can fall between the cracks in our broken system without the support they need.

The lottery of life



Xanthe took this picture in early January, Daisy was in for an MRI under general anaesthetic as her neurology team tried to work out why her physical abilities had deteriorated so dramatically over the past few months. It was only a few weeks later that same month that Daisy passed away in the intensive care ward of the hospital.

This picture does not just speak volumes about the bond that Daisy and I had, that speaks for itself.  For me it also tells a story of a little girl who was safe and sound.  No matter what was going on in her life, she was cared for, she had a roof over her head, she had access to help.

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